Combining the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) with Standardized Testing: An In-Depth Look at Squatting

Devin likes to go fishing; it’s his favorite hobby.  He is a five-year old boy with a diagnosis of bilateral cerebral palsy, GMFCS level 1.  Devin perches at the river’s edge in a deep squat in order to catch a glimpse of the trout beneath him.

Deep squatting is useful for a variety of reasons, like getting close to the floor to see something clearly, or to rest without getting on knees or bottom.  It requires adequate hip flexion range, ankle range, and postural control.  It is a developmental milestone.

When I look at the drawing of Devin, I wonder why:

  • Devin has an inverted foot position on right.
  • His low back position shows excessive lumbar flexion during a deep squat.
  • His pelvis is posteriorly tilted.
  • He is stabilizing, or limiting his degrees of freedom, by bracing his right elbow on his right knee and resting his chin firmly on his left knee.

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